In Demand, High Paying Medical Careers for 2014

Bio-Med graduates look ahead to career in medicine

Thirteen Bozeman High School students celebrated graduation from the Bio-Med program on Wednesday. Students tell us it is giving them an edge as they look toward the future. The Bozeman High school students who graduated have completed four years of medical and research courses.

NBC Montana talked with the Biomedical Sciences Department Chair, Amy Washtak, who told us students went through rigorous lab work. 75 students enrolled in the Bio-Med program at the high school back in the Fall of 2009. Only 13 of those students made it through, saying they have big plans for their future in the medical field.

“I’m still working to become a doctor because I think that it’s a great profession for me,” Alex Tseng. Tseng says throughout the four year program his Bio-Med classes at the high school opened up a whole new world. “They showed various other medical careers that belong in different medical fields,” said Tseng.

Another student told us he was accepted to MSU Billings where he plans to continue his medical education. “I’m going to MSU Billings. I’m playing baseball and hopefully majoring in a Pre-Med major,” said Cody Cooper.

Grace Arnes says she plans to use her skills over seas, helping to assist the sick and educate them about disease prevention.

…More at Bio-Med graduates look ahead to career in medicine – NBC Montana

6 High Paying Jobs in the Medical Field!

Payback Career #1: Registered Nurse

The U.S. Department of Labor publishes a chart titled “Occupations with the Largest Growth,” and guess which job tops the list? Registered nurse – with more than 700,000 jobs expected to be added in the field from 2010 to 2020. That’s a lot of jobs.

Why It Has a Future: A few things are leading to the increased demand for nurses, says Susan Heathfield, a management consultant and writer of About.com’s Guide to Human Resources. “First, the baby boomer generation is living longer and is more focused on health. Second, nursing is a bedside health care occupation, and something that can’t be done over the phone or via computer, so the jobs will stay here,” she says.

Information from the Department of Labor seems to back-up Heathfield’s assessment. Because of technological advances in health care, increased emphasis on preventive care, and an active baby boomer generation, the Department expects a 26 percent growth rate in this occupation from 2010 to 2020.

ROI Potential*: So just what do nurses make? According to the Department, the median annual income is $65,470, with the lowest paid 10 percent making $45,040, and the highest paid 10 percent pulling in $94,720. Not a bad ROI for helping people stay healthy.

Education Needed: The Department says there are three ways to pursue a career as a registered nurse: Earn an associate’s degree in nursing (ADN), a bachelor’s degree in nursing (BSN), or a diploma from an approved nursing program. You will also need to be licensed.

Payback Career #2: Dental Hygienist

If you’ve ever thought that dentistry might be a good fit for your career ambitions, but aren’t sure you want to spend the time – and money – to pursue the leading role of dentist, you might be interested in a supporting role in the same industry. Dental hygienists keep your smile bright and disease-free. And the job itself has a bright future.

Why It Has a Future: Heathfield says that dentists are relying on dental hygienists more and more because dentists are becoming busier thanks to that baby boomer generation. And as a result, “Because dentists are using them for more and more tasks, I see dental hygienist as a huge growth field,” she says.

And again, the U.S. Department of Labor agrees. As research continues to find links between oral and general health, the demand for preventative dental services will increase. And the Department of Labor’s projections for job growth? For dental hygienists, a whopping 38 percent growth is expected from 2010 to 2020. Translation: 68,500 jobs.

ROI Potential*: Keeping people smiling pays a median annual income of $70,210, with the lowest 10 percent of dental hygienists earning $46,540 and the highest 10 percent averaging at $96,280.

Education Needed: A minimum of an associate’s degree or certificate in dental hygiene is usually required by most private dentists’ offices, according to the Department of Labor. All states also require hygienists to have a license.

Payback Career #4: Diagnostic Medical Sonographer

Two reasons this career is a decent bet for the future: technology and health care. Yep, this occupation marries them both: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, diagnostic medical sonographers use sophisticated imaging equipment that sends sound waves into a patient’s body. Then they read the echoes to assess and diagnose medical conditions – or to tell if it’s a boy or a girl! Sound like the future calling?

Why It Has a Future: “Technology and equipment in hospitals is becoming so advanced and prevalent, so the people who can operate them are going to be more and more in demand,” says Heathfield. She adds that preventative care is becoming more prevalent and seen as cost-saving to managed care, and so tests such as those performed by diagnostic medical sonographers are becoming more valued.

The Department of Labor makes the point that the use of sonography (commonly known as sonograms, ultrasounds, and echocardiograms) will become more desirable to patients than invasive techniques and ones that result in radiation. For this and other reasons, the Department sees the profession of diagnostic medical sonographer growing by 44 percent from 2010 to 2020 – or 23,400 new jobs. That’s the kind of growth we like.

ROI Potential*: Apparently, firing sound waves into people pays. Specifically, the Department says diagnostic medical sonographers make an annual median salary of $65,860, with the lowest paid 10 percent making $44,990 and the highest 10 percent making $91,070.

Education Needed: Formal education, such as a postsecondary certificate or associate’s degree, is needed for diagnostic medical sonographer positions. According to the Department, a lot of employers require certification and prefer that diagnostic medical sonographers have a certificate or degree from an accredited hospital program or institute.

Payback Career #6: Medical and Health Services Manager

There’s a reason they call it “managed health care.” Yes, the medical field is about curing and preventing illness, but anyone who’s visited a doctor’s office or filled out a hospital admittance form knows that treating illness takes a healthy amount of management. Hence, medical and health services managers might do everything from run doctors’ practices to manage whole departments in health care facilities, says the U.S. Department of Labor.

Why It Has a Future: “Whatever you think of Obamacare, there’s one thing for certain: More and more dollars are going into health care in the future. And that means administrative [management] jobs will be on the increase and probably pay pretty well,” says Heathfield.

That certainly coincides with the Department of Labor’s take on this profession. They project that the job opportunities for medical and health care services managers will increase by 22 percent from 2010 to 2020. That’s about 68,000 new jobs being added.

ROI Potential*: You’ll probably be pleased with the ROI here too. The Department says that the median annual pay for medical and health services managers is $88,580. The bottom 10 percent make $53,940 and the top 10 percent earn $150,560.

…More at 6 High Paying Jobs in the Medical Field! | MommyPie.com

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