What is Holistic Nursing

A holistic nurse practices an unique sort of nursing that looks after the client’s entire being instead of simply the part of his body that is ill or harmed. A nurse who goes for holistic nursing cares for her patient’s spirit, body, and mind. The idea of holistic nursing is that a client’s special wellness beliefs, society, as well as atmosphere all play an important role in his ability to recover. A person who selects to become a holistic nurse typically gets the exact same level of education and learning and training a regular nurse does. After graduating, a hopeful

Exactly What Can You Do With a Doctorate Nursing Degree?

If you are thinking about pursuing a doctorate degree in nursing, you are not alone. In 2010, there was a 20 percent increase all over the country in nursing doctoral program enrollment. As of 2010, there were more than 3 million nurses nationwide, making it health care’s biggest career. However, the demand for added workers continued to be high, particularly for nurses with graduate degrees. Nursing Doctoral Degree Differences The two primary nursing doctor of philosophy in nursing (ND) and doctor of nursing practice (DNP). The ND prepares graduates for leadership and scholarship. Like various other conventional Ph.D. programs, the

Future Healthcare Careers in Demand – Update 2016

More men choosing nursing as a career JOHNSTOWN, Pa. (AP) — Paul Fedorchak of Bedford was a plant manager for Morton Metal Craft. When the company was bought out and the plant was closed in 2009, he decided to switch careers. Fedorchak became a registered nurse. “I always wanted to go into the medical field,” he said. “The plant closing was a blessing in disguise.” He qualified for education assistance under the federal Trade Adjustment Assistance that helps trade-affected workers who have lost their jobs as a result of increased imports or shifts in production out of the United States. He was one of

In Demand, High Paying Medical Careers for 2016

Bio-Med graduates look ahead to career in medicine Thirteen Bozeman High School students celebrated graduation from the Bio-Med program on Wednesday. Students tell us it is giving them an edge as they look toward the future. The Bozeman High school students who graduated have completed four years of medical and research courses. NBC Montana talked with the Biomedical Sciences Department Chair, Amy Washtak, who told us students went through rigorous lab work. 75 students enrolled in the Bio-Med program at the high school back in the Fall of 2009. Only 13 of those students made it through, saying they have big plans for their

Nurses and Their Impact on Oncology Care

nursing and top mecial jobsNurse dedicates her life to oncology

Tami O’Brien has seen people survive and she’s seen people die.

She’s held patients’ hands and watched parents scream and cry as their worst nightmares come true.

As the director of oncology at Northfield Hospitals and Clinics, the Waseca resident shared some of her stories with a smile on her face, and at one moment, tears in her eyes. Not once in the more than 20 years she’s worked with cancer patients has she wondered if she chose the right path.

“I never have days where I question why I do what I do,” O’Brien said. “I have good days and I have bad days, but it’s all so rewarding when a patient or their family tells you they would have never made it though, had they not had the support we gave.”

The toughest times

Day in and day out, she said, the most common thread that lingers throughout the oncology department is the fear of the unknown, the question: “Am I going to die?”

…More at Northfield nurse dedicates her life to oncology – Southernminn.com

To Oncology Nurses, From a Seasoned Patient

I don’t have a degree in medicine. I have not taken the rigorous classes you have taken. I cannot start an IV, take a pulse, identify a rash, or properly dress a wound. I have my degree in English. That means I can point out grammatical errors on restaurant menus, but measuring medicine into a vial hurts my brain.

I’m not trying to offer medical how-tos. Instead, I’m offering one patient’s perspective from the other side of the thermometer, the stethoscope, the hospital gown. So that you understand I have some legitimate experience to back up the advice I’m offering, here’s a glimpse at my treatment resume:

I was diagnosed with Stage 4B Hodgkin Lymphoma in 2009 at age 26. Four years later, we now know I have a rare, refractory strain of the disease. I’ve had more than 30 chemotherapy agents — several regimens requiring inpatient stays. I’ve had nurses come to my home to administer chemo. I’ve participated in several early phase clinical trials that required constant nurse-to-patient correspondence. I’ve had four surgical biopsies performed and underwent two failed autologous (my own cells) and an allogeneic (from a donor) stem cell transplant that required 25 consecutive days of inpatient isolation and much intimacy with nurses.

Medical teams at Hartford Hospital and Yale New Haven Hospital in Connecticut, MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas and Memorial Sloan-Kettering and Columbia/New York Presbyterian in New York City have treated me.

Through all this, I’ve had so many incredible, moving experiences with nurses. I am forever grateful to those medical team members and the selfless and steadfast care they gave that carried me through the ups and downs. I’ve had few bad encounters, but unfortunately, it’s those unpleasant ones that stand out and make you realize your vulnerability as a patient and how much you rely on the intelligence and thoroughness of your nurses.

…More at To Oncology Nurses, From a Seasoned Patient – Huffington Post

ED visits at the end of life: Helping patients maintain their care decisions

Despite a preference to receive end-of-life (EOL) care at home, many patients with advanced terminal illnesses actually go to the emergency department (ED) in their last months, weeks, and days of life. In fact, some hospital centers report that 40% of patients who present to the ED may be in their final 2 weeks of life.1 When patients are dying of cancer, their circumstances place crucial demands on hospital staff, which can be disruptive in several areas.

Why would a patient spend his or her final days or hours in a crowded ED? A trip to the ED of any hospital means long hours of waiting for the patient to be seen, which can be stressful for patients and caregivers—even those in relatively good health. In a paper published in the American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Medicine, researchers undertook an investigation to gain an understanding of why patients present at emergency departments during the most difficult time in their lives. The researchers hoped that understanding the behavior can help prevent it and allow patients dying of cancer to remain in their home during their last days.

This retrospective review was undertaken by Elaine M. Wallace, MB, BCh, BAO, MRCPI, and her colleagues in the Department of Palliative Medicine, Mid-Western Regional Hospital, Dooradoyle, Limerick, Ireland. They investigated why patients presented to the ED at the end of life, how the staff assessed the patient, what treatment the patient received, and what the outcome was. The researchers reviewed the records of 30 patients aged 47 to 89 years who went to the ED over a 6-month period. Their data was culled from the records from the ED, the hospital, and from the palliative care home care team.

…More at ED visits at the end of life: Helping patients maintain their care decisions – Oncology Nurse Advisor

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Originally posted 2013-06-07 00:00:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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