Choosing Your Nurse Practitioner Specialty in 2016

One of the critical decisions you must make on your path to becoming a NP is picking your nurse practitioner specialty. Your nursing professional specialized choice will impact your future career, so it is crucial to select carefully. The major distinction between a registered nurse and a nurse practitioner is that latter has completed master’s degree and hence could write out scripts for medicines whereas registered nurse can not. Many healthcare facilities hire their very own fleet of practitioners as they are cheaper than medical doctors. Because of this reason, there is wonderful possibility for nurse practitioners in many healthcare

How to Become a Travel Nurse

How to Become a Travel Nurse It’s true—there is a job that enables you to travel the country in a high-paying position while also helping people—that of the travel nurse. Travel nurses work as temporary fill-ins for people on sick or maternity leave, or help out during local emergencies or nursing staff shortages. A nurse must be an RN to become a travel nurse and the job duties correspond with the area of a nurse’s specialty—essentially the same duties the nurse would have within a healthcare establishment closer to home. Working outside of the country is also an option, although

Nurses and Their Impact on Oncology Care

Nurse dedicates her life to oncology Tami O’Brien has seen people survive and she’s seen people die. She’s held patients’ hands and watched parents scream and cry as their worst nightmares come true. As the director of oncology at Northfield Hospitals and Clinics, the Waseca resident shared some of her stories with a smile on her face, and at one moment, tears in her eyes. Not once in the more than 20 years she’s worked with cancer patients has she wondered if she chose the right path. “I never have days where I question why I do what I do,”

How to Become a Certified Nurse Anesthetist

Advanced Practices Take Nursing Career to Next Level Nursing is among the occupations in the highest demand locally and nationally, and offers excellent opportunities for good pay and benefits, but requiring a high degree of skill. Some nurses, however, choose to raise their skill level even higher, pursuing careers as advanced-practice nurses. In Orange County, the occupation of registered nurse ranks 12th for projected job openings from 2010 through 2020, according to the California Employment Development Department. In the 10-year period, more than 7,200 job openings for RNs are projected, including 3,740 newly created jobs and 3,460 due to RNs

Nurse Practitioners to Become More Independent Under Obamacare

Bracing for Obamacare: Nurse practitioners fill doc shortage gap

DEXTER, Ore. — It’s 8:15 a.m. on a warm July Wednesday and the parade of patients is already lining up for Mary Fey, a family nurse practitioner on the front lines of health reform in this rural community 100 miles south of Portland.

There’s the 32-year-old guy with a Hobo spider bite and high blood pressure, the 61-year-old with a sore shoulder from a tractor accident, the 9-year-old with allergies, the 91-year-old with dementia.

They all come to Fey, the sole primary care provider for nearly 30 miles in this region where doctors are in short supply – and the January launch of Obamacare is expected to make it worse.

“I’m pushing 1,500 patients now and that’s going to increase,” said Fey, 58, who refers to the coming changes as “the onslaught.”

Like nurse practitioners across the U.S., Fey is girding for the onset of reforms put in place by the 2010 Affordable Care Act, which offers some 32 million Americans new access to health insurance — but no guarantee of access to care.

“It will be better, but it’s painful to get to something better,” said Fey.

Experts estimate the U.S. is already short more than 9,000 primary care physicians, a number expected to rise to 65,800 by 2025, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Mother, son serve together in Afghanistan

Image by The U.S. Army via Flickr

If newly insured Americans are going to get care under the federal health overhaul, it’s Fey and her colleagues who will have to help fill the gap, analysts say.

‘Huge, huge solution’

“To me, nurse practitioners could be a huge, huge solution to this problem of primary care shortage,” said Dr. Thomas Bodenheimer, a professor of family and community medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine.

NPs, as they’re sometimes known, are registered nurses who hold graduate degrees and can perform virtually all of the functions of front-line family doctors — depending on the laws of the state they’re in.

…More at Bracing for Obamacare: Nurse practitioners fill doc shortage gap – NBCNews.com

Debate Over Role of Nurse Practitioners in Primary Care Responsibilities

An estimated 6 million Californians will be eligible for insurance under Obamacare — about 5 million through the Covered California marketplace and more than a million people via the Medi-Cal expansion.

Yet, just 16 of California’s 58 counties have enough primary care doctors right now. To try to improve access, California legislators are moving bills to expand “scope of practice” for such midlevel health providers as pharmacists and nurse practitioners. In general, such bills would allow certain health providers to practice more independently. Right now, in many cases, they must be overseen by physicians. More autonomy could open access for underserved groups.

But some of those ideas are being hotly debated in Sacramento.

The toughest scope-of-practice sell right now seems to be nurse practitioners. Earlier this week,SB 491, which would expand nurse practitioner duties, failed to get out of committee. It will be up for a vote again next week. State Sen. Ed Hernandez (D-West Covina), an optometrist himself, joined KQED Forum Friday to discuss the bill. He said California needs to “utilize providers within their training” to help ease this “huge access problem in primary care.”

California, as it turns out, is among only a handful of states with the most restrictive policies (see map) around nurse practitioners and patient care. Paul Phinney, a pediatrician and president of the California Medical Association, said “allowing nurse practitioners to practice independently fragments care.” He agreed there is tremendous primary care need, but said a better way to address the problem would be to “have physicians and nurse practitioners work collaboratively in teams.”

…More at Debate Over Role of Nurse Practitioners in Primary Care Responsibilities – KQED (blog)

Bills on nurse practitioners, pharmacists advance in Assembly

SACRAMENTO — Measures that would expand the roles of nurse practitioners and pharmacists advanced in the Assembly on Tuesday, setting the stage for a fierce lobbying battle in the session’s final weeks.

Both measures wade into the so-called scope of practice debate over what type of medical care can be administered  by non-physicians, setting off a turf war between doctors and other medical providers.

The more contentious of the two bills is SB 491, which would allow nurse practitioners to practice without physicians’ supervision. The measure, written by state Sen. Ed Hernandez (D-West Covina) failed to muster enough support in the Assembly’s Business, Professions and Consumer Protection Committee last week by a 6-3 vote, with five committee members abstaining.

Hernandez offered a narrower version of the bill Tuesday, which would allow nurse practitioners to operate independently only if they practice at a hospital, clinic or some other medical facilities. That was enough to bring on two additional Assembly Democrats — Richard Gordon of Menlo Park and Chris Holden of Pasadena — and pass with an 8-3 vote.

Hernandez is also the author of SB 493, which would allow pharmacists to independently administer some vaccines, and provide certain nicotine replacement drugs and hormonal contraceptives. It passed the Assembly Health Committee on an 18-0 vote.

Both bills now move to the Assembly Appropriations Committee.

Supporters of the Hernandez bills say that nurse practitioners, pharmacists and other medical providers can help secure healthcare access in places where there are not enough doctors to meet patients’ demand. That strain could be exacerbated with the implementation of President Obama’s healthcare law, which will increase the number of newly insured patients seeking treatment.

“If we are going to be mandating that every single person buy health insurance, then we better make sure that there’s enough people to see these people safely,” said Hernandez, who is head of the Senate Health Committee.

Doctors counter that allowing non-physicians to practice independently could put patients in harm’s way.

…More at Bills on nurse practitioners, pharmacists advance in Assembly – Los Angeles Times

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Originally posted 2014-06-17 06:15:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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