Choosing Your Nurse Practitioner Specialty in 2016

One of the critical decisions you must make on your path to becoming a NP is picking your nurse practitioner specialty. Your nursing professional specialized choice will impact your future career, so it is crucial to select carefully. The major distinction between a registered nurse and a nurse practitioner is that latter has completed master’s degree and hence could write out scripts for medicines whereas registered nurse can not. Many healthcare facilities hire their very own fleet of practitioners as they are cheaper than medical doctors. Because of this reason, there is wonderful possibility for nurse practitioners in many healthcare

What are The Best Medical Field Jobs 2016

Interested in discovering a higher paying career that will not need years of colleges and university or thousands of dollars of loan personal debt? Take into consideration a project in the medical field. The project market in the medical area has actually continued to be sturdy in spite of the existing recession, and also with several positions needing only a couple years of college, many healthcare employees can take advantage of a higher salary as well as effortless access to advancement in a few years time. A few of the top careers in the medical industry for 2012 include: Registered

High Paying Healthcare Careers 2016

Top Paying Healthcare Jobs with an Associate’s Degree The healthcare market continues to be among the fastest growing service-providing sectors in the nation. The majority of health care jobs are extremely specialized and also require applicants have actually a required level. A permit and an affiliate’s level might be all that is needed to land some incredibly lucrative jobs in the market. Several of these occupations pay an average yearly wage of over $ 50,000, relying on experience and with geographic place. Health care careers that offer an average pay over $ 50,000 a year with a partner’s degree consist

In Demand, High Paying Medical Careers for 2016

Bio-Med graduates look ahead to career in medicine Thirteen Bozeman High School students celebrated graduation from the Bio-Med program on Wednesday. Students tell us it is giving them an edge as they look toward the future. The Bozeman High school students who graduated have completed four years of medical and research courses. NBC Montana talked with the Biomedical Sciences Department Chair, Amy Washtak, who told us students went through rigorous lab work. 75 students enrolled in the Bio-Med program at the high school back in the Fall of 2009. Only 13 of those students made it through, saying they have big plans for their

Expanding Medical Careers – RWJF Grants

As early as 1972, when the leaders of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) defined the issues they hoped to address as part of the Foundation’s commitment to social change in health care, there was an awareness of the need to provide a better path to success for disadvantaged young people interested in careers in medicine.

The statistics of the day illustrated the importance of the issue. In 1970, racial and ethnic minority groups constituted 16 percent of the United States population, but only 2.3 percent of the nation’s medical students and just 5.9 percent of all medical professionals, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges.

In addition, the Foundation realized that in order to be effective, our nation’s health care workforce needed to reflect all of our communities and include people with a broad range of backgrounds and abilities.

Research has not only shown that minority physicians and dentists are more likely to treat medically underserved populations, some studies also show higher levels of patient satisfaction and better care when there is patient-physician race or ethnic concordance.

By 2003, RWJF pathway (pipeline) program guidelines were also expanded to include socioeconomically disadvantaged students.

In order to address the significant gap between the number of talented young people interested in medicine and the number who were actually able to find the mentoring, role models and support needed to develop careers, RWJF created a series of programs to open doors to a new generation of physicians, nurses, dentists and other health care professionals.

Starting with Undergraduates

RWJF’s first effort to nurture tomorrow’s medical professional was a $13 million project called thePre-professional Minority Programs initiative (1972–1994). The summer academic enrichment curriculum was designed to prepare promising minority college students to enter medical school. The program model included counseling, tutoring and specially tailored premedical courses.

It was followed by the Minority Medical Education Program, which would be the forerunner for the Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP), a highly successful pathway program credited with generating the largest number of RWJF program alumni. Beginning with the summer class of 1989, and continuing to 2011, more than 20,000 students have participated in SMDEP. The program focus expanded to include dentistry training in 2005, in recognition of the link between low access to oral health services and underrepresentation of minority and disadvantaged students in dental schools. By 2012, RWJF had invested more than $67 million in the SMDEP initiative.

SMDEP provides a six-week program at 12 sites across the country, selecting 80 college freshmen and sophomores (per site).  They receive rigorous enrichment courses, labs and preparation for exams and other entrance requirements for medical and dental school.

Throughout the 1990s and 2000s, the Foundation continued to support young medical or nursing students and entry-level health care workers in a variety of ways, including:

▪ Ladders in Nursing Careers Program – In response to an extreme nursing shortage in New York City in 1988, RWJF created the Ladders program to support low income and minority

hospital and nursing home employees who wished to become nurses. The $5 million program was eventually expanded to include eight states.

▪ National Medical Fellowships – From 1990-1996, RWJF expanded its scholarship support for minority medical students with this $5 million project.

▪ The Health Professions Partnership Initiative – This $7 million, 1994-2008 initiative co-funded by the Kellogg Foundation, established partnerships among health professions schools, undergraduate colleges, K–12 school systems and community-based organizations to prepare students academically for medical school and other health professions schools.

▪ The Sullivan Alliance – Supported with $200,000, between 2007 and 2010, the Alliance was created to increase the number of minorities in the health professions by working with historically black medical colleges and other academic institutions. The project was funded by RWJF, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the Kellogg Foundation. Project goal was to implement report recommendations offered by the Sullivan Commission and the Institute of Medicine.

▪ The Pipeline, Profession and Practice: Community-Based Dental Education Program (alsocalled the Dental Pipeline Program). Over nine years, (2001–2010), RWJF funded dental schools with $23 million in grants to increase access to dental care for underserved populations. The program accomplished its goals through community-based clinical education programs and increasing recruitment and retention of underrepresented minority dental students.

The California Endowment funded the California schools that participated in the program.

More at Pathway Programs Deliver Medical Careers – Robert Wood Johnson

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Originally posted 2016-04-30 03:21:50. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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