How to Become a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist CRNA

A Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist or CRNA, is a registered nurse that has advanced training and experience in providing anesthesia. There are three primary prerequisites for getting in a nurse anesthesia training program. They include being a registered nurse certified within one state, having actually graduated from an authorized university with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree or various other suitable baccalaureate degree, and have actually finished a minimum of one year experience working in an intense care setting as a registered nurse. Applying to a Nurse Anesthesia Program Achieve a high score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

How to Become a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner

A psychiatric nurse practitioner or (PMH-NP) is a skilled nurse who offers specialist mental care for adult and kid patients in a main health care setting or in outpatient setups. Nurse practitioners specializing in psychological conditions have a nursing degree, have passed the nursing boards and have actually finished from a Masters of Nursing (nurse specialist) program. Psychiatric nurse practitioners can identify psychological conditions of grownups and kids, conduct treatment, and prescribe medicines for their clients. They can diagnose and deal with an array of medical conditions like psychological disorders, medical mental conditions, drug abuse conditions, learning ailments etc. The

Highest Paying Nurse Jobs

Nurses have always played a key position in treating patients. They perform a wide range of clinical and non-clinical treatments in order to offer patients optimum levels of care. Nurses outnumber all other healthcare professions. There are more than 2,600,000 registered nurses in the U.S. Registered nurses can earn substantial salaries based on their level of education and skill levels. The following nursing specialties are currently the highest paying nursing jobs nationwide: Originally posted 2016-05-03 19:05:01. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

What is the demand for nurses abroad internationally

Nursing jobs are now considered the most sought-after career the world over. People who want to advance in both career and financial terms now consider taking the nursing path. The worldwide clamor for nursing is backed by several reasons. The nursing career is so full of options. As a nurse, you can choose your own specialization, and you can also fit your knowledge and skills to an area of specialization that best suits you. Aside from that, the nursing profession is now one of the most revered and acclaimed professions in the world. Career advancement is already a given, and

Nurses and Their Impact on Oncology Care

nursing and top mecial jobsNurse dedicates her life to oncology

Tami O’Brien has seen people survive and she’s seen people die.

She’s held patients’ hands and watched parents scream and cry as their worst nightmares come true.

As the director of oncology at Northfield Hospitals and Clinics, the Waseca resident shared some of her stories with a smile on her face, and at one moment, tears in her eyes. Not once in the more than 20 years she’s worked with cancer patients has she wondered if she chose the right path.

“I never have days where I question why I do what I do,” O’Brien said. “I have good days and I have bad days, but it’s all so rewarding when a patient or their family tells you they would have never made it though, had they not had the support we gave.”

The toughest times

Day in and day out, she said, the most common thread that lingers throughout the oncology department is the fear of the unknown, the question: “Am I going to die?”

…More at Northfield nurse dedicates her life to oncology – Southernminn.com

To Oncology Nurses, From a Seasoned Patient

I don’t have a degree in medicine. I have not taken the rigorous classes you have taken. I cannot start an IV, take a pulse, identify a rash, or properly dress a wound. I have my degree in English. That means I can point out grammatical errors on restaurant menus, but measuring medicine into a vial hurts my brain.

I’m not trying to offer medical how-tos. Instead, I’m offering one patient’s perspective from the other side of the thermometer, the stethoscope, the hospital gown. So that you understand I have some legitimate experience to back up the advice I’m offering, here’s a glimpse at my treatment resume:

I was diagnosed with Stage 4B Hodgkin Lymphoma in 2009 at age 26. Four years later, we now know I have a rare, refractory strain of the disease. I’ve had more than 30 chemotherapy agents — several regimens requiring inpatient stays. I’ve had nurses come to my home to administer chemo. I’ve participated in several early phase clinical trials that required constant nurse-to-patient correspondence. I’ve had four surgical biopsies performed and underwent two failed autologous (my own cells) and an allogeneic (from a donor) stem cell transplant that required 25 consecutive days of inpatient isolation and much intimacy with nurses.

Medical teams at Hartford Hospital and Yale New Haven Hospital in Connecticut, MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas and Memorial Sloan-Kettering and Columbia/New York Presbyterian in New York City have treated me.

Through all this, I’ve had so many incredible, moving experiences with nurses. I am forever grateful to those medical team members and the selfless and steadfast care they gave that carried me through the ups and downs. I’ve had few bad encounters, but unfortunately, it’s those unpleasant ones that stand out and make you realize your vulnerability as a patient and how much you rely on the intelligence and thoroughness of your nurses.

…More at To Oncology Nurses, From a Seasoned Patient – Huffington Post

ED visits at the end of life: Helping patients maintain their care decisions

Despite a preference to receive end-of-life (EOL) care at home, many patients with advanced terminal illnesses actually go to the emergency department (ED) in their last months, weeks, and days of life. In fact, some hospital centers report that 40% of patients who present to the ED may be in their final 2 weeks of life.1 When patients are dying of cancer, their circumstances place crucial demands on hospital staff, which can be disruptive in several areas.

Why would a patient spend his or her final days or hours in a crowded ED? A trip to the ED of any hospital means long hours of waiting for the patient to be seen, which can be stressful for patients and caregivers—even those in relatively good health. In a paper published in the American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Medicine, researchers undertook an investigation to gain an understanding of why patients present at emergency departments during the most difficult time in their lives. The researchers hoped that understanding the behavior can help prevent it and allow patients dying of cancer to remain in their home during their last days.

This retrospective review was undertaken by Elaine M. Wallace, MB, BCh, BAO, MRCPI, and her colleagues in the Department of Palliative Medicine, Mid-Western Regional Hospital, Dooradoyle, Limerick, Ireland. They investigated why patients presented to the ED at the end of life, how the staff assessed the patient, what treatment the patient received, and what the outcome was. The researchers reviewed the records of 30 patients aged 47 to 89 years who went to the ED over a 6-month period. Their data was culled from the records from the ED, the hospital, and from the palliative care home care team.

…More at ED visits at the end of life: Helping patients maintain their care decisions – Oncology Nurse Advisor

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Originally posted 2013-06-07 00:00:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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